Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture | William Kentridge
Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture | William Kentridge

Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture is now open at Norval Foundation and will present three-dimensional work of William Kentridge from the past 19 years. This is the first exhibition internationally to address Kentridge’s output as a sculptor.

Covering several bodies of work, and testifying to his longstanding and spontaneous improvisation when handling three-dimensional form, Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture sees the origins of these works in props from his operas and images from his animations stepping off the stage and out of the screen, confronting us directly at ground level. Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture also premieres new works commissioned for the occasion of this special exhibition.

Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture | William Kentridge
Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture | William Kentridge

The show is the largest Kentridge exhibition held in Africa in over a decade. The exhibition at Norval Foundation is accompanied by a concurrent exhibition at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA), entitled: “Why Should I Hesitate: Putting Drawings to Work”.

Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture | William Kentridge
Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture | William Kentridge

Exhibition title: Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture
Venue: Atrium and Galleries 2-8, Norval Foundation, 4 Steenberg Road, Tokai
Run dates: 24 August 2019 – 23 March 2020
Exhibition curators: Karel Nel, Owen Martin, Talia Naicker, Vicky Lekone

Exhibition title:Why Should I Hesitate: Putting Drawings To Work
Venue: Level 3 Galleries and throughout, Zeitz MOCAA; Silo District, V&A Waterfront
Run dates: 25 August 2019 – 23 March 2020
Exhibition curators: Azu Nwagbogu, assisted by Tammy Langtry 

Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture | William Kentridge
Why Should I Hesitate: Sculpture | William Kentridge

About William Kentridge 

William Kentridge is internationally acclaimed for his drawings, films, theatre and opera productions.

His practice is born out of a cross-fertilisation between mediums and genres, and responds to the legacies of colonialism and apartheid. His aesthetics are drawn from the medium of film’s own history, from stop-motion animation to early special effects. Kentridge’s drawing, specifically the dynamism of an erased and redrawn mark, is an integral part of his expanded animation and filmmaking practice.

Kentridge’s work has been seen in museums and galleries around the world since the 1990s, including Documenta in Kassel, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Albertina Museum in Vienna, Musée du Louvre in Paris, Whitechapel Gallery in London, Louisiana Museum in Copenhagen and the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid.

Opera productions include Mozart’s The Magic Flute, Shostakovich’s The Nose, and Alban Berg’s Lulu, and have been seen at opera houses including the Metropolitan Opera in New York, La Scala in Milan, English National Opera in London, Opera de Lyon, Amsterdam opera, and others. Summer 2017 saw the premiere of Kentridge’s production of Berg’s Wozzeck for the Salzburg Festival. The Head & the Load, sometimes described as a processional opera (with original music by composers Philip Miller and Thuthuka Sibisi), opened to critical acclaim in London and New York in 2018.

Kentridge is the recipient of honorary doctorates from several universities including Yale and the University of London, and in 2012 he presented the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard University. In 2010, he received the Kyoto Prize. In 2015 he was appointed an Honorary Academician of the Royal Academy in London. In 2017, he received the Princesa de Asturias Award for the arts, and in 2018, the Antonio Feltrinelli International Prize.