Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington

By Jessica Ross
Styling Sven Alberding
Photographs Warren Heath, Bureaux

For two wedding and event planners, a century-old barn in Wellington, South Africa, provided the perfect setting for raising their young family.

With the all the requisite characteristics of a modern-industrial barn, from lofty pitched ceilings and corrugated roofing to solid raw brick walls, Hannes and Tina Maritz’ home has been brought to life out of a former dairy. ‘Old buildings have fascinated me ever since I can remember,’ says Hannes, who together with wife Tina owns Kraak, a South African wedding and events company.

Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington

After trawling through property sites to find his dream barn, Hannes soon landed on this storage facility – a century-old dairy in the small agricultural town of Wellington, located 45 minutes outside Cape Town. The building’s bones were in good nick, but it desperately lacked infrastructure, so the couple set out on a nine-month-long renovation installing plumbing and electricals and building a bedroom. The simple yet effective configuration was perfect for the two of them: one long open-plan ground floor living space, comprising kitchen, dining and lounge areas, with their bedroom, and a peaceful whitewash room, upstairs.

‘When we found out Tina was pregnant with Jacob (now 4), we realised we needed a space for him. We got this crazy idea to build a Wendy house inside the downstairs area,’ Hannes remembers with a chuckle. A few years later, the pair prepared to welcome their youngest child, Kranhold (now 1.5 years old), into the fold, and they knew it was time for another major renovation, eschewing the Wendy house for two additional living zones.

Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington
The dining room table is from Tina’s family house, and the pendant lights above are from Mr Price Home. They sourced the Persian rug from a local carpet shop who had an auction.

Big swathes of glass were installed to separate the kids’ bedrooms downstairs from the communal living zone, but still let the sense of openness on the ground floor prevail. Another narrow pane on the opposite side of the space intersects the wall, reaching right up to the roof of the top floor bedroom. True to the style of the building, the glass sheets recall old factory windows and make it feel airier, more elegant and doubly spacious.

Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington
Jacob and Kranhold’s bedroom has a subtle blue theme. The couple inherited the beds from Tina’s family. The table and chairs are pieces from Hannes’ childhood, and the pendants are from a former dairy that sells pieces from local farms and factories.

Tina and Hannes’ decor has undergone something of a metamorphosis, too, since the first time they moved in. Hannes’ style lent more towards extravagant pieces in bright, bold colour, Tina’s aesthetic comprised elegant lines in white and oak. Today their look is a sophisticated blend of warm wood pieces in neutral tones with eye-catching vintage furnishings and accessories.

Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington
Hannes on the extra-length, deep-buttoned Chesterfield sofa. The piece, which once belonged to his late friend, has very special sentimental value.

Avid collectors, the two hunt second hand and antique stores in search of covetable antique objects and lucky finds. They especially seek out items from old factories in the area, rescuing retro pendant lights from becoming junkyard scraps. ‘We are at a place now where we both really feel comfortable with each item.’ Most of the pieces that decorate the home have a story, like the extra-length Chesterfield couch that belonged to a friend who passed away, or the piano that sits in the kids’ room, inherited from Tina’s family, and the Etsy stove, a rare find which took eight people to lug indoors.

‘We’re constantly stimulated with events and designs of spaces, so we are trying to keep it very natural and neutral at home,’ Hannes explains. Wooden tables and wicker seats texturally play off the soft velvety feel of the cushions, pouffes and an outsize deep-buttoned ottoman in the living area. Against the exposed brick walls and screed flooring, the earthy tan and leather tones are complemented by the wealth of indoor plants. ‘It’s a bit of a greenhouse,’ muses Hannes, surveying the botanical element that pops against all the industrial finishing’s. Tropical hues spill out to the verandah seating area, which features a green velvet sofa set – the vestiges of Hannes’ flirtations with colour – surrounded by fresh bursts of flora. ‘The house is built under two gigantic ficus trees, and nothing can really grow under them, so we built the stoep to fill it up with plants. It’s very cool there in summer.’

Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington
Hannes and Tina’s affinity for vintage is evident in the lounge set on the front stoep, which offers the perfect escape from the summer heat.

As you walk from the stoep indoors, you can’t help but stop to study the detailed Delft tiling that covers the front steps. It’s then that you remember Kraak, their brand name meaning ‘crack’ in Afrikaans, is also a type of Chinese porcelain which influenced the painterly blue-and-white Dutch ceramic in the 17th century. ‘We absolutely love Delft,’ Hannes enthuses. It’s yet another of the couple’s precious collections imbued with history and character – just like their family home.

Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington
The kitchen is filled with salvaged and vintage pieces such as the table, which works double duty as an island and a workspace. The pendant light is from an old barn in Paarl that was demolished and renovated. The footstool pouffe is custom-designed and made by a local upholsterer; hide was sourced in Namibia.
Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington
The bathroom is a textural feast for the eyes, with rough, raw brick walls, bright plants and the sheen of the copper ball-and-claw tub.
Bureaux Hannes and Tina Maritz Wellington
The serene white bedroom is a peaceful zone for the couple, and one of the first additions they made to their former dairy.